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Time to HealAmerican medical education from the turn of the century to the era of managed care$
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Kenneth M. Ludmerer

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195181364

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195181364.001.0001

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World War II and Medical Education

World War II and Medical Education

Chapter:
(p.125) 7 World War II and Medical Education
Source:
Time to Heal
Author(s):

Kenneth M. Ludmerer

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195181364.003.0007

Medical schools had long been responsible for the quality of care rendered civilians, but during World War II they took direct responsibility for the military's medical care as well. The proportion of faculty that enlisted in the armed services was much higher than that of the general profession. At the country's 52 general hospital units and 20 evacuation hospital units, the medical personnel, which numbered about 2,500, came almost entirely from academic medical centers. At home, schools were extremely short-staffed, but they nonetheless increased the production of doctors to meet both military and civilian needs. In addition, they conducted an extraordinary amount of war-related medical research, which enabled a dramatic reduction in death and suffering among troops in combat.

Keywords:   physicians, medical care, World War II, medical personnel, medical schools, medical research

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