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RossiniHis Life and Works$
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Richard Osborne

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195181296

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195181296.001.0001

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Mosè in Egitto and Return to Pesaro (1818)

Mosè in Egitto and Return to Pesaro (1818)

Chapter:
(p.52) Chapter Six Mosè in Egitto and Return to Pesaro (1818)
Source:
Rossini
Author(s):

Richard Osborne

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195181296.003.0006

A new “grand oratorio,” Mosè in Egitto, was finished in mid-February, ahead of its first performance on March 5, and the libretto for a second opera, Ricciardo e Zoraide, was in Gioachino Rossini’s luggage when, in mid-April, he left Naples to spend three months in Bologna. Also in his luggage was a contract for a private commission from a patron in Lisbon, Gaetano Pezzana. Odd as the commission was, it was not untypical of the interest now being taken in Rossini beyond Italy, in places as far afield as Paris and Saint Petersburg. Closer to home, the building of a new theater in Pesaro was also nearing completion. Rossini had already been sounded out about the possibility of his choosing an opera for the opening night and overseeing its staging. Now, as he worked on Mosè in Egitto, the planning for the Pesaro gala began in earnest.

Keywords:   grand oratorio, libretto, opera, Gioachino Rossini, Naples, commission, Gaetano Pezzana, Pesaro

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