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RossiniHis Life and Works$
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Richard Osborne

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195181296

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195181296.001.0001

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Naples, Rome, and Milan (1816–1817)

Naples, Rome, and Milan (1816–1817)

Chapter:
(p.42) Chapter Five Naples, Rome, and Milan (1816–1817)
Source:
Rossini
Author(s):

Richard Osborne

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195181296.003.0005

Gioachino Rossini returned to Naples to find that the San Carlo theatre had been gutted by fire. Within a year it would be lavishly rebuilt under the supervision of the architect to the royal theatres, Antonio Niccolini. If there was an exception to the rule that impresarios of the period were moneyed amateurs or wheeler-dealing businessmen, it was the man responsible for Rossini’s next commission, the lawyer, diplomat, and former private secretary to the finance minister of Napoleon Bonaparte’s kingdom of Italy, Angelo Petracchi. Rossini had signed a contract with Petracchi the previous October. Determined to restore his standing with the Milanese public after the disappointments of his two operas two years previously, he left Rome. After a brief stopover in Bologna, he arrived in Milan, where he remained until the new opera was safely launched.

Keywords:   Gioachino Rossini, Naples, Antonio Niccolini, Napoleon Bonaparte, Italy, Angelo Petracchi, Rome, Milan

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