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Advances in the Sign-Language Development of Deaf Children$
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Brenda Schick, Marc Marschark, and Patricia Elizabeth Spencer

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195180947

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195180947.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 August 2019

Issues of Linguistic Typology in the Study of Sign Language Development of Deaf Children

Issues of Linguistic Typology in the Study of Sign Language Development of Deaf Children

Chapter:
(p.20) 2 Issues of Linguistic Typology in the Study of Sign Language Development of Deaf Children
Source:
Advances in the Sign-Language Development of Deaf Children
Author(s):

Dan I. Slobin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195180947.003.0002

This chapter has two goals: first, to consider some lessons which have been learned from the cross-linguistic study of hearing children and their acquisition of a range of spoken languages; and second, to situate the study of sign languages in a typological framework. The focus is thus on issues of linguistic analysis, with special attention to typology. It presents some case studies to demonstrate how child language research over the past decades has been forced to move away from the impulse to take a familiar language — generally English — as representing the child’s initial assumptions about the nature of language.

Keywords:   deaf children, sign language development, spoken language learning, language acquisition, linguistic analysis

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