Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Multinational Corporations and Foreign Direct InvestmentAvoiding Simplicity, Embracing Complexity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stephen D. Cohen

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195179354

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195179354.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 October 2019

 Where Multinational Corporations Invest and Don't Invest and Why

 Where Multinational Corporations Invest and Don't Invest and Why

Chapter:
(p.148) 7 Where Multinational Corporations Invest and Don't Invest and Why
Source:
Multinational Corporations and Foreign Direct Investment
Author(s):

Stephen D. Cohen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195179354.003.0008

Because not even the largest MNC can afford to invest in every country, an important phase of the FDI cycle is the process by which a country chooses where to establish its foreign subsidiaries. The heterogeneity of business strategies and objectives means that no single guideline exists for manufacturing and services companies when selecting appropriate overseas sites. This chapter begins with a statistical breakdown showing the asymmetrical geographical distribution of MNCs, with emphasis on their concentration in industrial countries. Next, the various positive factors that attract MNCs to certain countries, including financial incentives, are examined in detail. A separate section examines the various conditions that tend to repel incoming FDI. A recurring theme is that those persons believing MNCs to be a negative force on host countries would applaud government policies to discourage their entry or impose comprehensive regulation; advocates of private enterprise would have the opposite value judgment.

Keywords:   corruption, official financial incentives, business regulation, agglomeration economies, Trade-Related Investment Measures Agreement

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .