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Healthier SocietiesFrom Analysis to Action$
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Jody Heymann, Clyde Hertzman, Morris L. Barer, and Robert G. Evans

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195179200

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195179200.001.0001

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Universal Medical Care and Health Inequalities: Right Objectives, Insufficient Tools

Universal Medical Care and Health Inequalities: Right Objectives, Insufficient Tools

Chapter:
(p.107) Chapter 5 Universal Medical Care and Health Inequalities: Right Objectives, Insufficient Tools
Source:
Healthier Societies
Author(s):

Noralou P. Roos

Marni Brownell

Verena Menec

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195179200.003.0006

This chapter aims to answer the question: What role does medical care play in determining population health? The Canadian health care system, with its universal medical care coverage, provides an important opportunity for assessing the impact of medical care on health. This chapter presents the findings of research examining this question in the province of Manitoba in a study that spans ten years, and reviews existing evidence on the relation between socioeconomic disparities, health care use, and health. It concludes that while a universal health care system is definitely the right policy tool for delivering care to those in need, investments in health care should not be confused with policies whose primary intent is to improve population health or reduce inequalities in health.

Keywords:   population health, Canada, Manitoba, universal medical care, health care use, health inequalities

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