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Crossing Confessional BoundariesThe Patronage of Italian Sacred Music in Seventeenth-Century Dresden$
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Mary Frandsen

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195178319

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195178319.001.0001

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Johann Georg II Remembered

Johann Georg II Remembered

Chapter:
(p.438) Epilogue Johann Georg II Remembered
Source:
Crossing Confessional Boundaries
Author(s):

Mary E. Frandsen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195178319.003.0009

Through his consistent patronage of Italian musicians and his demonstrable predilection for the musical idiom of modern Italy, Johann Georg II effectively opened a new musical age in Dresden, and permanently altered the soundscape in the electoral court chapel, once dominated by the music of Heinrich Schüt. In order to accomplish the sweeping changes that he had already begun to envision in the 1640s, he reached beyond the boundaries of his own land, language, and confession, and augmented his Hofkapelle with foreign virtuoso singers and composers. But the most unusual role filled by Johann Georg during his reign as elector was that of liturgist. Rather than concede all liturgical responsibility to his court preacher, he demonstrated a keen personal interest in the manner in which worship was celebrated at court and took a firm hand in developing the liturgical forms to be used in the chapel. It is from the perspective of aesthetic achievement, rather than that of political accomplishment, that the legacy of Johann Georg II is best assessed, for in this realm his contributions are significant and can be counted alongside those of his aspirational peers in Bavaria and Austria.

Keywords:   Johann Georg II, worship, liturgical forms, musical patronage

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