Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Redemptive SelfStories Americans Live By$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dan P. McAdams

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195176933

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176933.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 November 2019

CULTURE, NARRATIVE, AND THE SELF

CULTURE, NARRATIVE, AND THE SELF

Chapter:
(p.271) Ten CULTURE, NARRATIVE, AND THE SELF
Source:
The Redemptive Self
Author(s):

Dan P. McAdams

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176933.003.0011

This chapter places research and theory on the redemptive self into a larger conceptual context that links personality and culture. The redemptive self is a particular kind of life story, and life stories exist as one of three different levels of human personality. At Level 1, dispositional traits (e.g., extraversion, neuroticism, agreeableness) sketch out a broad outline of psychological individuality. At Level 2, characteristic adaptations (e.g., motives, goals, strategies, roles, and other socially and temporally contextualized features of personality) fill in the details of psychological individuality. At Level 3, internalized and evolving life stories (e.g., the redemptive self) spell out what a person thinks his or her life means in the overall, providing an understanding of how the person makes meaning and finds coherence in life. Culture has minimal impact on traits, substantially more impact on people's characteristic adaptations, and maximal impact on life stories, in that culture provides individuals with a menu of images, themes, plots, characters, and metaphors for constructing a narrative of the self.

Keywords:   Ruth Benedict, personality psychology, personality traits, the Big Five, motives, individualism, collectivism, characteristic adaptations, life stories

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .