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A Greener FaithReligious Environmentalism and Our Planet's Future$
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Roger S. Gottlieb

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195176483

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176483.001.0001

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Religion and the Human Meaning of Environmental Crisis

Religion and the Human Meaning of Environmental Crisis

Chapter:
(p.3) Introduction Religion and the Human Meaning of Environmental Crisis
Source:
A Greener Faith
Author(s):

Roger S. Gottlieb

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176483.003.0001

There are more diffuse, harder to identify, but equally threatening dimensions of the environmental crisis, besides the physical threat and physical loss. There is not only a danger to our physical and economic well-being but a unique challenge to our fundamental sense of what it means to be human. Rethinking of our most important beliefs regarding who we are and how we ought to live is required. Recognizing our present moral failings and despair over the future, grim questions about our collective goals and limits must be confronted. The explosive proliferation of industrial chemicals, the endless stream of pesticides, the unforeseen consequences surrounding genetically modified organisms—these cause us to think about placing some restraints on our scientific and technological innovation. Religion offers hopes of miracles, morally instructs and comforts us, and reassures us that a change of heart is always possible, for if God can act for us, we can also act for ourselves.

Keywords:   physical threat, physical loss, physical well-being, economic well-being, human, crisis, religion

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