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The Trust Crisis in HealthcareCauses, Consequences, and Cures$
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David A. Shore

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195176360

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176360.001.0001

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Conclusion: Trust in Healthcare, Trust in Society

Conclusion: Trust in Healthcare, Trust in Society

Chapter:
(p.188) 19 Conclusion: Trust in Healthcare, Trust in Society
Source:
The Trust Crisis in Healthcare
Author(s):

Marc J. Roberts

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176360.003.19

Patients as consumers are playing an increasingly large role in the healthcare system and medical decision-making. This shift in roles suggests trust must be a central feature in every healthcare organization's competitive strategy in order to attract and retain patients. This chapter focuses on why trust is critical, and yet so difficult to cultivate at the organizational level; why building trust is more difficult in the healthcare sector than other industries; how trust can lead to competitive advantage; and possible responses for managers to address the trust issue. Medical care is based on scientific research, but still relies on physician intuition and judgments that may be mistaken. Instead, the healthcare industry should support well-designed studies so that physicians can provide evidence-based care. The chapter examines the two components of trust—competence and conscience—and how these two aspects exist and interact in modern medicine.

Keywords:   competitive advantage, trust in healthcare, evidence-based care, healthcare consumer

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