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The Trust Crisis in HealthcareCauses, Consequences, and Cures$
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David A. Shore

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195176360

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176360.001.0001

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Patients’ Trust in Their Doctors: Are We Losing Ground?

Patients’ Trust in Their Doctors: Are We Losing Ground?

Chapter:
(p.79) 7 Patients’ Trust in Their Doctors: Are We Losing Ground?
Source:
The Trust Crisis in Healthcare
Author(s):

Dana Gelb Safran

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176360.003.07

This chapter evaluates the patient-physician relationship's role in declining trust. Previous studies have shown this relationship is a predictor of patient loyalty and trust. The chapter defines a patient's trust in his or her physician as comprising three parts: confidence in their integrity, confidence in their clinical knowledge and skill, and confidence in their promise to put the patient's interests before other financial interests. It describes how the information age, declining morale among physicians, and different models of health insurance can affect this relationship. The ultimate goal of evaluating the quality of patient-physician relationships is to improve both business outcomes and health outcomes. The chapter emphasizes why the patient-physician relationship is a good place to start rebuilding trust, resulting in tremendous payoffs.

Keywords:   health outcomes, business outcomes, patient-physician relationship, patient trust

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