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Party/PoliticsHorizons in Black Political Thought$
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Michael Hanchard

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195176247

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176247.001.0001

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Garnet’s Dictum, the Color Line, and Mixed Race: Notes on Hybridity and Miscegenation

Garnet’s Dictum, the Color Line, and Mixed Race: Notes on Hybridity and Miscegenation

Chapter:
(p.183) Chapter 7 Garnet’s Dictum, the Color Line, and Mixed Race: Notes on Hybridity and Miscegenation
Source:
Party/Politics
Author(s):

Michael Hanchard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176247.003.0007

This chapter uses part of a speech by the famous orator and abolitionist, Henry Highland Garnet, to examine some of the similarities between late 19th- and early 20th-century ideologies of racial egalitarianism in the New World and contemporary advocacy of hybridity, or what one scholar refers to as the “amalgamation thesis.” It further uses Garnet's declaration that the Western world is destined to become a “mongrel race” to pose a counterfactual for students of African-American studies, black politics, and African diaspora studies: What if Garnet's dictum, rather than Du Bois's declaration in the The Souls of Black Folk concerning “the color line” were the dominant trope for the probing of racial identification, categorization, and consciousness?

Keywords:   abolitionist, Henry Highland Garnet, egalitarianism, New World, hybridity, amalgamation thesis, African diaspora, Du Bois, color line

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