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Brain and Visual PerceptionThe Story of a 25-year Collaboration$
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DAVID H. HUBEL and TORSTEN N. WIESEL

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780195176186

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176186.001.0001

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Ocular Dominance Columns Revealed by Autoradiography

Ocular Dominance Columns Revealed by Autoradiography

Chapter:
(p.317) Chapter 18 Ocular Dominance Columns Revealed by Autoradiography
Source:
Brain and Visual Perception
Author(s):

David H. Hubel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176186.003.0018

This chapter presents a paper entitled “Autoradiographic demonstration of ocular dominance columns in the monkey striate cortex by means of transneuronal transport”. In the macaque monkey, the geniculostriate pathway terminates in a very dense, highly localized manner, mainly in layer IV C. Projections from the two eyes end in a characteristic alternating stripe-like pattern of ocular dominance columns. If radioactive substances were transported transneuronally, injection of labeled material into one eye followed by autoradiography of the cortex might reveal the entire system of ocular dominance columns. This study confirmed Grafstein's original findings of transneuronal transport in the mammalian visual system and provided an additional independent demonstration of the ocular dominance columns in the striate cortex.

Keywords:   ocular dominance columns, autoradiography, geniculostriate pathway, transneuronal transport

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