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Brain and Visual PerceptionThe Story of a 25-year Collaboration$
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DAVID H. HUBEL and TORSTEN N. WIESEL

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780195176186

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176186.001.0001

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Recording Fibers in the Cat Corpus Callosum

Recording Fibers in the Cat Corpus Callosum

Chapter:
(p.231) Chapter 13 Recording Fibers in the Cat Corpus Callosum
Source:
Brain and Visual Perception
Author(s):

David H. Hubel

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195176186.003.0013

This chapter presents a paper entitled “Cortical and Callosal Connections Concerned with the Vertical Meridian of Visual Fields in the Cat”. The study made simultaneous recordings from visual areas in the two hemispheres, looking for possible overlap between the receptive fields of cells on the two sides. It also recorded fibers directly from the corpus callosum and examined to what extent they were preoccupied with the vertical meridian. The findings suggest that certain fibers in the corpus callosum link cells whose fields are close together but lie on opposite sides of the vertical meridian. These fibers seem to serve the same functions as intracortical fibers linking cells with the receptive fields clustered in more outlying parts of the visual fields.

Keywords:   cat corpus callosum, receptive fields, vertical meridian, simultaneous recordings

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