Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Models for Intensive Longitudinal Data$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Theodore A. Walls and Joseph L. Schafer

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195173444

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195173444.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 December 2019

Application of Item Response Theory Models for Intensive Longitudinal Data

Application of Item Response Theory Models for Intensive Longitudinal Data

Chapter:
(p.84) 4 Application of Item Response Theory Models for Intensive Longitudinal Data
Source:
Models for Intensive Longitudinal Data
Author(s):

Donald Hedeker

Robin J. Mermelstein

Brian R. Flay

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195173444.003.0004

Item response theory (IRT), or latent trait models, provide a statistically rich class of tools for analysis of education test and psychological scale data. In the non-complex case, these data are comprised of a sample of subjects responding dichotomously to a set of test or scale items. The focus is on the estimation of characteristics of the items and subjects. These methods were mainly made in the 1960s through 1980s, though their roots can be traced to Thurstone in the 1920s. A reference on ITRT is the book of Lord and Novick, and, specifically, the chapters written by Birnbaum. Prior to the growth of IRT, classical test theory was used to estimate an individual's score in a test.

Keywords:   item response theory, latent trait, Thurstone, Novick, Birnbaum, classical test

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .