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The Beauty of the PrimitiveShamanism and Western Imagination$
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Andrei A. Znamenski

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780195172317

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195172317.001.0001

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 Power Plants

 Power Plants

Psychedelic Culture Meets Tribal Spirituality

Chapter:
(p.121) 4 Power Plants
Source:
The Beauty of the Primitive
Author(s):

Andrei A. Znamenski

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195172317.003.0004

This chapter looks at the relationship between shamanism and psychedelic culture, focusing on the experience of investment banker R. Gordon Wasson and his Russian-born wife, Valentina, with mushrooms. Valentina and Gordon eventually embarked on their lifelong quest to explore the role of mushrooms in the histories and folklore of different cultures. When Valentina died of cancer in 1958, Gordon continued this quest alone. Eventually, his explorations evolved into research on possible links between hallucinogenic mushrooms and early religion. What came out of this research was a small community of scholarship that brought together people who believed that plant hallucinogens gave rise to human spirituality in archaic times; essentially, Wasson and his colleagues added a new hallucinogenic dimension to shamanism studies. That “psychedelic scholarship,” which was closely linked to the counterculture of the 1960s, not only informed the debates about shamanism among academics but also aroused and fed public interest in shamanism.

Keywords:   shamanism, R. Gordon Wasson, psychedelic culture, spirituality, plant hallucinogens, mushrooms, 1960s counterculture, anthropology

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