Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Carpet Monsters and Killer SporesA Natural History of Toxic Mold$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Nicholas P. Money

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780195172270

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195172270.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 June 2019

Stachybotrys versus Superpower

Stachybotrys versus Superpower

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 Stachybotrys versus Superpower
Source:
Carpet Monsters and Killer Spores
Author(s):

Nicholas P. Money

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195172270.003.0001

This chapter begins with an overview of the treatment of indoor molds by the national media, stories of celebrity victims of mold exposure, and the epidemic of lawsuits related to fungal growth in homes. The outbreak of lung bleeding among infants in Cleveland in the 1990s, and subsequent study by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is another feature of this introductory chapter. Initial research identified the infants’ exposure to the mold Stachybotrys as the likely cause of their illness, but this conclusion was retracted later and remains highly controversial. Various approaches to assessing and treating mold growth are introduced to set the stage for the detailed discussion of every facet of the mold issue.

Keywords:   major media, lawsuits, celebrity victims, lung bleeding, Cleveland, CDC, Stachybotrys

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .