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Louisiana HayrideRadio and Roots of Music along the Red River$
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Tracey E. W. Laird

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195167511

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195167511.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.149) Conclusion
Source:
Louisiana Hayride
Author(s):

Tracey E. W. Laird

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195167511.003.0007

Due to the fact that the Louisiana Hayride brought to the national spotlight both Hank Williams and Elvis Presley, they took a risk in claiming the annals of country music and rock-and-roll during the postwar era in U.S. history. But the Hayride's story does not end with its final broadcast, but with the multiple directions taken by the four influential sidemen formed during the post-World War II era in Shreveport. Commerce plays an essential role in this story of music. In the context of country music, Presley manifested fluency between black and white musicians that had deep roots in the religious singing of the South's evangelical past. The Hayride might have remained as another live radio broadcast; still Shreveport gained a central position in the history of country music and a place in the larger context of southern musical culture because of its radio station.

Keywords:   Hank Williams, country music, commerce, Elvis Presley, evangelical past, denominations

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