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Louisiana HayrideRadio and Roots of Music along the Red River$
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Tracey E. W. Laird

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195167511

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195167511.001.0001

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Hillbilly Music and KWKH Radio

Hillbilly Music and KWKH Radio

Chapter:
(p.57) 4 Hillbilly Music and KWKH Radio
Source:
Louisiana Hayride
Author(s):

Tracey E. W. Laird

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195167511.003.0005

The history of KWKH demonstrates the potency of the use of radio signals for communication from a regional to a national audience. It started from local radio. This chapter looks at the effects of World War II on the industry wherein early radio created new opportunities for isolated theaters of music and culture. It also opened contexts of exchange for business, ides, and, music. Over time, radio's potency resulted in the creation of a hybridized music culture. Though the pioneer developers of radio technology envisioned radio not as just entertainment, after a few years, radio took over the phonograph in its primacy in American media. KWKH's formation in the mid-1920s provided the gateway for the emergence of independent radio.

Keywords:   broadcasting, theaters, music culture, media conglomeration, media, independent radio

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