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Mighty Like a RiverThe Black Church and Social Reform$
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Andrew Billingsley

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780195161793

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195161793.001.0001

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The Storm Is Passing Over: The Black Church in Perspective

The Storm Is Passing Over: The Black Church in Perspective

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 The Storm Is Passing Over: The Black Church in Perspective
Source:
Mighty Like a River
Author(s):

Andrew Billingsley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195161793.003.0002

The St. James Baptist Church was a warm and caring place that nurtured emotional and spiritual growth as well as latent talent in its members. There were sonic socially significant spinoffs to this St. James Baptist Church experience. This church was not alone in this respect. All over town it would have been hard to find a black church in the early 1950s that was actively engaged in the community. The testimonial to the success of the civil rights movement is presented. Some of the most productive of scholars — W.E.B. Du Bois, F. Franklin Frazier, and C. Eric Lincoln — have established that the black church is a profoundly social institution and often serves as an agent of social reform.

Keywords:   black church, St. James Baptist Church, civil rights movement, W.E.B. Du Bois, F. Franklin Frazier, C. Eric Lincoln, social reform

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