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The Apocalyptic Year 1000Religious Expectation and Social Change, 950-1050$
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Richard Landes, Andrew Gow, and David C. Van Meter

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780195161625

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195161625.001.0001

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Adso of Montier-en-Der and the Fear of the Year 1000

Adso of Montier-en-Der and the Fear of the Year 1000

Chapter:
(p.81) 3 Adso of Montier-en-Der and the Fear of the Year 1000
Source:
The Apocalyptic Year 1000
Author(s):

Daniel Verhelst

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195161625.003.0004

Christianity has repeatedly experienced events that have given rise to eschatological expectations. Over and over again, people have emerged who, with ambitious curiosity, have attempted to evaluate the duration of world history. Likewise, the legend of the Antichrist and the expectation of the end of the world were, at various times in late antiquity and the Middle Ages, perceived by some as a threatening reality. Both of these themes had a traditional basis, passed on from one generation to the next. Cosmic and biological omens, religious commotion, and heresies often triggered such expectations. Hence, annals, chronicles, and hagiographical works tend to give normal cosmic events an apocalyptic twist. Also, the abbot of Montier-en-Der, in northeastern France, developed an enduring synthesis of the eschatological vision and tradition.

Keywords:   Christianity, legend, Antichrist, Adso, abbot, Montier-en-Der, France

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