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Nature, Nurture, and the Transition to Early
                        Adolescence$
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Stephen A. Petrill, Robert Plomin, John C. DeFries, and John K. Hewitt

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780195157475

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195157475.001.0001

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Memory Ability during Middle Childhood and Early Adolescence in the Colorado Adoption Project

Memory Ability during Middle Childhood and Early Adolescence in the Colorado Adoption Project

Chapter:
(p.62) 5 Memory Ability during Middle Childhood and Early Adolescence in the Colorado Adoption Project
Source:
Nature, Nurture, and the Transition to Early Adolescence
Author(s):

Stephen A. Petrill

Sally-Ann Rhea

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195157475.003.0005

This chapter explores memory ability in the Colorado Adoption Project (CAP) at ages nine, ten, twelve, and fourteen. Although memory has been examined longitudinally in conjunction with other cognitive abilities, this chapter examines memory ability in CAP more systematically using isomorphic tests measured during the transition from middle childhood to adolescence. Given that heritability of memory may vary by the type of memory measure employed, the chapter first analyzes different aspects of memory through both phenotypic and univariate genetic analyses before exploring their longitudinal relationships. It is hypothesized in this chapter that like other cognitive abilities such as verbal ability, spatial ability, and perceptual speed, genes will be largely responsible for the similarity in memory across time while the non-shared environment will be largely responsible for the discrepancy between longitudinally assessed memory scores. The results show that the correlation between memory tests was driven almost completely by shared genetic factors while the discrepancy between memory tasks was influenced largely by the non-shared environment (and error).

Keywords:   Colorado Adoption Project, memory ability, middle childhood, early adolescence, heritability, genetic factors, non-shared environment

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