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Developmental Influences on Adult IntelligenceThe Seattle longitudinal study$
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K. Warner Schaie

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195156737

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195156737.001.0001

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Subjective Perceptions of Cognitive Change

Subjective Perceptions of Cognitive Change

Chapter:
(p.344) chapter fifteen Subjective Perceptions of Cognitive Change
Source:
Developmental Influences on Adult Intelligence
Author(s):

K. Warner Schaie

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195156737.003.0015

This chapter examines the accuracy of adults' perceptions with regard to an issue that is of increasing concern with age: whether our intellectual abilities are actually declining. These concerns were investigated by evaluating the accuracy of participants' assessment of intellectual change over seven years. Subjective report of performance change was compared with actual observed change over seven years. The seven-year retrospective data were replicated for a second seven-year period in 1991 and the stability of the congruence types identified in this study over a fourteen-year period was investigated. Judgments of short-term change after repeated testing and training interventions spanning a four-week period for three different training occasions were also evaluated.

Keywords:   Seattle Longitudinal Study, cognitive changes, subjective perceptions, intellectual abilities, cognitive decline, primary mental abilities, congruence types

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