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Russian IdentitiesA Historical Survey$
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Nicholas V. Riasanovsky

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195156508

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195156508.001.0001

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Russia from the Death of Nicholas I to the Abdication of Nicholas II, 1855–1917

Russia from the Death of Nicholas I to the Abdication of Nicholas II, 1855–1917

Chapter:
(p.167) 8 Russia from the Death of Nicholas I to the Abdication of Nicholas II, 1855–1917
Source:
Russian Identities
Author(s):

Nicholas V. Riasanovsky (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195156508.003.0009

This chapter discusses the events that took place after the death of Nicholas I. It narrates that Nicholas I passed his throne to his son, Alexander II, and instructed him to liberate the serfs. It defines Nihilism as concentrated on the individual, whom it promised to liberate from all the prejudices hemming human existence. It mentions some new populist writers who became important and influential. It discusses that Alexander III's reign experienced increased pressure on non-Orthodox denominations and a growth of the policy of Russification. Alexander III was often been described as the first nationalist on the Russian throne. It explains that Nicholas II, Alexander III's eldest son, became the autocratic ruler of Russia after his father's death in 1894.

Keywords:   Russification, Orthodoxy, Alexander II, Alexander III, Nicholas II, nationalism, Panslavism, nihilism

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