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Russian IdentitiesA Historical Survey$
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Nicholas V. Riasanovsky

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195156508

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195156508.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.231) Conclusion
Source:
Russian Identities
Author(s):

Nicholas V. Riasanovsky (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195156508.003.0011

This chapter investigates the end of the reign and death of several well-known leaders of Russia, and the transition from the ideologies and the men of the 1840s to those of the 1860s. It discusses that Russian nationalism and patriotism remained profited greatly from the collapse of the Soviet Union. It argues that it was the refusal of Yeltsin and the Russian republic to support the U.S.S.R. that brought its doom. It narrates that democratic institutions have replaced the Party and the Soviet government, and they have claimed the allegiance of the authorities ever since Gorbachev. It explains that economic change has resulted in the impoverishment of many, as well as a fantastic enrichment of a few. It adds that corruption and crime was rampant. It discusses that since the downfall of the U.S.S.R., Russia has confounded pessimists as well as optimists.

Keywords:   Russia, nationalism, patriotism, Soviet Union, U.S.S.R, Putin regime, Eurasianism, economic change, Communism

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