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Inventing the Business of OperaThe Impresario and His World in Seventeenth-Century Venice$
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Jonathan Glixon and Beth Glixon

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195154160

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195154160.001.0001

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THE COMPOSITION AND THE PRODUCTION OF THE OPERA SCORE

THE COMPOSITION AND THE PRODUCTION OF THE OPERA SCORE

Chapter:
(p.140) CHAPTER SIX THE COMPOSITION AND THE PRODUCTION OF THE OPERA SCORE
Source:
Inventing the Business of Opera
Author(s):

Beth L. Glixon

Jonathan E. Glixon

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195154160.003.0006

This chapter discusses the composition of opera in mid-17th-century Venice and the production of the score. Nearly all opera composers also pursued other means of employment, but the significant fees that could be earned made the extra work worthwhile. The most highly paid composer was Francesco Cavalli, who managed to negotiate favorable contracts at several different theaters. Pietro Andrea Ziani was another popular composer who continued to supply operas even after he took a job in Vienna. The composer was usually responsible for supplying copies of the score; he often assisted at rehearsals, made revisions to the score (tailoring it to the various singers), and led the orchestra as well. On occasion an older score was mounted, rather than a new one, inevitably saving the impresario money.

Keywords:   composer, contracts, impresario, copies, rehearsals, orchestra, revisions, Francesco Cavalli, Pietro Andrea Ziani

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