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Inventing the Business of OperaThe Impresario and His World in Seventeenth-Century Venice$
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Jonathan Glixon and Beth Glixon

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195154160

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195154160.001.0001

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THE BOXES: A MAJOR SOURCE OF INCOME

THE BOXES: A MAJOR SOURCE OF INCOME

Chapter:
(p.17) CHAPTER TWO THE BOXES: A MAJOR SOURCE OF INCOME
Source:
Inventing the Business of Opera
Author(s):

Beth L. Glixon

Jonathan E. Glixon

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195154160.003.0002

This chapter focuses on the development of the opera box as a means of income for the theater. All of the regularly operating theaters had boxes, and the annual rental fees provided significant income for either the impresario or the theater owner. The number of levels and the number of boxes within each level varied from theater to theater, and over the years various impresarios or theater owners would either decrease or increase the number of boxes with the aim of increasing either the income, or the size and comfort of the box. Towards the end of the 17th century, those desiring a box would pay in advance a gift, or regalo, in order to claim ownership indefinitely; these fees eventually made possible the building of new theaters. The systems by which fees were collected from recalcitrant box renters or owners are also discussed.

Keywords:   opera box, regalo, impresario, theater owner, box renters

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