Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Inventing the Business of OperaThe Impresario and His World in Seventeenth-Century Venice$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jonathan Glixon and Beth Glixon

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195154160

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195154160.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 November 2019

INTRODUCTION TO THE BUSINESS OF OPERA IN SEVENTEENTH‐CENTURY VENICE: PEOPLE AND FINANCES

INTRODUCTION TO THE BUSINESS OF OPERA IN SEVENTEENTH‐CENTURY VENICE: PEOPLE AND FINANCES

Chapter:
(p.3) CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION TO THE BUSINESS OF OPERA IN SEVENTEENTH‐CENTURY VENICE: PEOPLE AND FINANCES
Source:
Inventing the Business of Opera
Author(s):

Beth L. Glixon

Jonathan E. Glixon

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195154160.003.0001

After discussing the management of comedy theaters in Venice, this chapter examines the financial structure behind the opera business, exploring various sources of income, such as investors, loans, rental of seats and boxes, advances from the printer, and ticket sales. While the renters and managers of the comedy theaters usually came from the noble class, opera theaters tended to be run by artisans or members of the professional class. The opera business was sustained through the availability of guarantors who would repay loans and other debts remaining at the end of the season.

Keywords:   investors, loans, artisans, guarantors, opera business, comedy theaters

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .