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The Navel of the DemonessTibetan Buddhism and Civil Religion in Highland Nepal$
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Charles Ramble

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780195154146

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195154146.001.0001

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 The Encounter with Buddhism

 The Encounter with Buddhism

Chapter:
(p.147) 5 The Encounter with Buddhism
Source:
The Navel of the Demoness
Author(s):

Charles Ramble (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195154146.003.0006

The encounter between Himalayan communities and Buddhism is sometimes oversimplified both in ethnographic studies and in the autobiographical accounts of missionary lamas. Buddhism has come to Te not as a set of abstract moral and dogmatic precepts but through different clerical institutions. The religious needs of the community have long been served by Nyingmapa tantric priests from an adjacent settlement. The archives of two such families reveal the insecurities of certain prominent figures in their competition for patronage. The apprenticeship and the civic duties of these priests is examined. The Sakyapa school of Buddhism, the dominant monastic tradition in Mustang, was once influential in Te. However, the community of monks eventually lost its religious character and evolved into a class of traders.

Keywords:   Buddhism, autobiographies, lamas, Nyingmapa tantric priests, archives, Sakyapa, monks, Mustang, trade

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