Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Recognition in Mozart's Operas$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jessica Waldoff

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195151978

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195151978.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 July 2019

Operatic Enlightenment in Die Zauberflöte

Operatic Enlightenment in Die Zauberflöte

Chapter:
(p.17) 1 Operatic Enlightenment in Die Zauberflöte
Source:
Recognition in Mozart's Operas
Author(s):

Jessica Waldoff

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195151978.003.0002

This chapter illustrates the value of recognition as an approach by providing a detailed analysis of plot, text, and music in Zauberflöte. With its rich store of enlightenment metaphor and symbolism, its overt treatment of knowledge as subject, and its marvelous dénouement in which the ascendance of light vanquishes the forces of darkness, this opera offers a marvelous demonstration of how recognition works at the levels of plot and theme. Tamino's famous colloquy with the priest in the Act I finale is read as a recognition scene. Later recognition scenes involving Papageno, Pamina, and Tamino are also discussed. The final section suggests that the contrivance (and reversal) various critics have sensed in Zauberflöte may be understood as what Terence Cave has called the “scandal of recognition”.

Keywords:   Die Zauberflöte, recognition, knowledge, contrivance, Terence Cave, scandal of recognition, Tamino

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .