Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Silent VictoriesThe History and Practice of Public Health in Twentieth Century America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

John W. Ward and Christian Warren

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195150698

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195150698.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 October 2019

Polio Can Be Conquered: Science and Health Propaganda in the United States from Polio Polly to Jonas Salk

Polio Can Be Conquered: Science and Health Propaganda in the United States from Polio Polly to Jonas Salk

Chapter:
(p.81) 5 Polio Can Be Conquered: Science and Health Propaganda in the United States from Polio Polly to Jonas Salk
Source:
Silent Victories
Author(s):

Naomi Rogers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195150698.003.05

In the 1940s and 1950s, health officials in the United States regularly published popular guides to polio prevention, therapeutic manuals for the care of paralyzed patients, and inspirational tales of the disabled polio victims overcoming social stigma and achieving success. These tracts became a potent publicity tool to popularize faith in scientific research as the best weapon in the fight against disease. The popularized polio literature combined medical theory, philosophy, public health policy, and frequently a commercial message. Long before the polio vaccines were developed, health experts—especially those employed by the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (NFIP)—made scientific research a public enterprise, in which even obscure scientific questions could be laid out and debated.

Keywords:   poliomyelitis, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, public health, consumer health literature, Jonas Salk, health pamphlets, March of Dimes, Elizabeth Kenny

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .