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Health StatisticsShaping policy and practice to improve the population's health$
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Daniel J. Friedman, Edward L. Hunter, and R. Gibson Parrish

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195149289

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195149289.001.0001

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From Health Statistics to Health Information Systems: A New Path for the Twenty-First Century

From Health Statistics to Health Information Systems: A New Path for the Twenty-First Century

Chapter:
(p.443) Chapter 18 From Health Statistics to Health Information Systems: A New Path for the Twenty-First Century
Source:
Health Statistics
Author(s):

Charlyn Black

Leslie L. Roos

Noralou P. Roos

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195149289.003.0018

Many countries are making significant investments to enhance their health statistics capabilities. These involve a range of activities, from renewing traditional data collections and extending their content and coverage, to increasing the flexibility and integration of data, to enhancing approaches to protecting privacy and confidentiality of data, and finally to improving the utility and accessibility of data. A bold new vision is needed to provide direction to these efforts. While enormous progress was made in developing health statistics systems during the 20th century, current approaches fall short of providing a framework for moving into the future. This chapter first outlines some of the forces that provide impetus for a new vision and, from this, identifies several characteristics that are critical to incorporate into future efforts. It then provides an update on experience gained in Manitoba, Canada, with development of a prototype health information system. The chapter concludes by considering opportunities for the future.

Keywords:   traditional data collections, population health statistics, Manitoba, health information system, integration of data

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