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From Paris to PeoriaHow European Piano Virtuosos Brought Classical Music to the American Heartland$
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R. Allen Lott

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780195148831

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195148831.001.0001

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“Unfortunately … He Also lalks”

“Unfortunately … He Also lalks”

Chapter:
(p.251) CHAPTER 15 “Unfortunately … He Also lalks”
Source:
From Paris to Peoria
Author(s):

R. Allen Lott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195148831.003.0018

Hans von Bülow was notoriously frank and admitted in a newspaper interview that Carl Bergmann had been fired as his conductor in Boston because of dereliction of duty and his interest in beer, like most Germans as he was quoted to say. His anti-German remarks created an outrage and concert attendance at many of Bülow's appearances suffered. Although Bülow was generally considered to have a more perfect technique and memory than Rubinstein, and surpassed his friendly rival on such issues as fidelity to the score and conscientious interpretation, Bülow was still found wanting by being too intellectual, analytical, and distant. In Baltimore, his appearances included concerts with the Peabody Institute Orchestra conducted by his former pupil Asger Hamerik, and in Washington, D.C., he made acquaintance with Romaine von Overbeck, with whom he would fall in love.

Keywords:   Hans von Bülow, Carl Bergmann, Anton Rubinstein, Asger Hamerik, Romaine von Overbeck

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