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The Soul of RecoveryUncovering the Spiritual Dimension in the Treatment of Addictions$
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Christopher Ringwald

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195147681

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195147681.001.0001

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Harm Reduction: Challenging Tradition on the Street with Transcendence

Harm Reduction: Challenging Tradition on the Street with Transcendence

Chapter:
(p.159) Chapter VII Harm Reduction: Challenging Tradition on the Street with Transcendence
Source:
The Soul of Recovery
Author(s):

Cristopher D. Ringwald

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195147681.003.0007

Treatment professionals, friends, and relatives believe that helping alcoholics and addicts recuperate and live improved lives would entail loving the sinner and condemning the sin. Those who advocate harm-reduction strategies believe that it would also be possible for unhelped addicts still to acquire the necessary treatments since, in line with religion, it is also possible for society to love the sinner despite the sins that he or she has committed. This chapter explains how harm reduction strategies can provide still active addicts with the necessary care and assistance without forcing them to refrain from their habits and enter treatment. Doing such would make them realize a deep spirituality in themselves that would hopefully lessen the harm caused by the addiction and make recovery more easily reachable.

Keywords:   sin, sinner, harm-reduction strategies, abstinence, treatment, spirituality

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