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Altruism and Altruistic LoveScience, Philosophy, and Religion in Dialogue$
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Stephen G. Post, Lynn G. Underwood, Jeffrey P. Schloss, and William B. Hurlbut

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195143584

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195143584.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 21 October 2019

A Note on the Neurobiology of Emotions

A Note on the Neurobiology of Emotions

Chapter:
(p.264) 15 A Note on the Neurobiology of Emotions
Source:
Altruism and Altruistic Love
Author(s):

Antonio R. Damasio

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195143584.003.0023

Altruistic love is an emotion, a very complex emotion. It is a naturally a very complex feeling. Feelings are the mental representation of all the changes that occur in the body and in the brain during an emotional state. Emotion usually brings to mind one of the so-called primary or universal emotions. Pleasure and pain, drives and motivations, are the deep components of the complex phenomena we call emotions and feelings. In the language of neurobiology, emotions are complicated collections of chemical and neural responses, initiated in the brain and forming a pattern. All emotions participate in achieving, directly or indirectly, a biological correction of some kind. Feelings are images, and those images derive from the neural patterns that represent the entire range of changes associated with an emotion. Emotions are biologically constructed processes and depend on brain devices available at birth.

Keywords:   emotion, feelings, pleasure and pain, motivations, responses

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