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Altruism and Altruistic LoveScience, Philosophy, and Religion in Dialogue$
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Stephen G. Post, Lynn G. Underwood, Jeffrey P. Schloss, and William B. Hurlbut

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195143584

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195143584.001.0001

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Emerging Accounts of Altruism

Emerging Accounts of Altruism

“Love Creation's Final Law”?

Chapter:
(p.212) 13 Emerging Accounts of Altruism
Source:
Altruism and Altruistic Love
Author(s):

Jeffrey P. Schloss

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195143584.003.0019

Darwinism contributed a theory by which the brutality of nature could be viewed as redemptively generating beneficial outcomes. The significant aspect of inclusive fitness theory is that it not only makes sense of many previously puzzling behaviors but that it also reconceptualizes fitness to entail both progeny and kin. The picture of human nature that thus emerges is one wholly governed by “nepotism and favoritism”. Critics of such conclusions drawn from initial sociobiological applications of kin selection and reciprocal altruism theory have described it as a “slapdash egoism, a natural expression of people's lazy-minded vanity, an armchair game of cops and robbers which saves them the trouble of real inquiry and flatters their self-esteem.”

Keywords:   tinclusive fitness heory, slapdash egoism, nepotism, favoritism, critics

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