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Studies in Contemporary Jewry an Annual XV 1999$
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Ezra Mendelsohn

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780195134681

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195134681.001.0001

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Was Urbanization Harmful to Jewish Tradition and Identity in Germany?

Was Urbanization Harmful to Jewish Tradition and Identity in Germany?

Chapter:
(p.80) Was Urbanization Harmful to Jewish Tradition and Identity in Germany?
Source:
Studies in Contemporary Jewry an Annual XV 1999
Author(s):

Steven M. Lowenstein

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195134681.003.0006

German Jewry has often been depicted in terms of the contrast between a core area of traditional Jewishness in small towns and an urban Jewish population that was culturally creative and prosperous but weak in Jewish identity and commitment. According to this scenario, urbanization was an important element in the overall process of “modernization” that led away from tradition and toward secularization and eventual assimilation. This picture of urbanization as a move away from Judaism was not only widespread among German Jews; it has also found favor among scholars dedicated to the study of German Jewry. This chapter considers whether there is a basis in fact for the view of urbanization in German Jewry as a move toward assimilation, in contrast with the forces in the United States and other countries.

Keywords:   German Jews, German Jewry, urbanization, assimilation, Judaism

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