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Studies in Contemporary Jewry an Annual XV 1999$
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Ezra Mendelsohn

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780195134681

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195134681.001.0001

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Efraim Sicher, Jews in Russian Literature after the October Revolution: Writers and Artists Between Hope and Apostasy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. 225 pp.

Efraim Sicher, Jews in Russian Literature after the October Revolution: Writers and Artists Between Hope and Apostasy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. 225 pp.

Chapter:
Efraim Sicher, Jews in Russian Literature after the October Revolution: Writers and Artists Between Hope and Apostasy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. 225 pp.
Source:
Studies in Contemporary Jewry an Annual XV 1999
Author(s):

Alice Nakhimovsky

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195134681.003.0033

A review of the book, Jews in Russian Literature after the October Revolution: Writers and Artists Between Hope and Apostasy by Efraim Sicher is presented. Sicher's new book takes up the issue of Jewish consciousness among Jewish writers from the Revolution through the Second World War. He begins with a historical and thematic overview that includes some interesting observations on the Jewish appropriation of the Christ figure, and on the visual arts in general. He then moves to discreet essays on four of the greatest Russian writers of Jewish origin: Isaac Babel, Osip Mandelstam, Boris Pasternak and Ilya Ehrenburg. Following his always erudite and insightful analysis, we can see how the problem of Jewish origin was worked out for each writer, in combination with its old antipodes — Christianity and ethnic Russianness — as well as with the writer's own poetics.

Keywords:   Christianity, Jewish consciousness, Jewish writers

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