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The Divine Office in the Latin Middle AgesMethodology and Source Studies, Regional Developments, Hagiography$
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Rebecca A. Baltzer and Margot E. Fassler

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780195124538

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195124538.001.0001

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The Antiphoner of Compiègne

The Antiphoner of Compiègne

Paris, BNF lat. 17436

Chapter:
(p.147) 6 The Antiphoner of Compiègne
Source:
The Divine Office in the Latin Middle Ages
Author(s):

Ritva Jacobsson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195124538.003.0007

The antiphoner of Compiègne (F-Pn MS lat. 17436), sometimes called the antiphoner of Charles the Bald, is the oldest existing Latin Office book, perhaps copied around 870. Although lavish, it is full of textual errors and was neither prepared for musical notation nor later supplied with neumes and reveals that is a kind of anthology copied from many different sources. This study of the Office for the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle compares two different works both found in the Antiphoner, showing the complexities of the source materials available at the time and the great accomplishments of those individuals who created new liturgical materials for the Office from the Bible and many other sources, always with a sophisticated understanding of their contexts.

Keywords:   liturgical books, antiphoners, Charles the Bald, Office, Andrew the Apostle, manuscripts and prints, Office books, St. Andrew, responsories, antiphons

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