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Ira GershwinThe Art of the Lyricist$
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Philip Furia

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780195115703

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195115703.001.0001

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Changing My Tune: 1946–1951

Changing My Tune: 1946–1951

Chapter:
(p.193) 11 Changing My Tune: 1946–1951
Source:
Ira Gershwin
Author(s):

Philip Fuma

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195115703.003.0011

At his death, George Gershwin left a legacy of dozens of completed songs, for which words could still be set, and stacks of tunebooks with many more songs sketched in fragmentary form. On top of this “new” material were many songs that had been cut from shows and films, such as “Ain't It Romantic?” which was discarded from Oh, Kay! in 1926 and went into the trunk as “Melody No. 44.” With revised lyrics, Ira knew, such gems might shine in new productions. Still other songs, such as “Love Is Here To Stay” and “They Can't Take That Away from Me,” had been wasted in their original contexts; showcased in better productions these might finally garner the recognition they merited. Such a treasure of musical material, all of it sitting in Ira's home, was a constant temptation to continue his collaboration with George at the same time that he was working with other composers.

Keywords:   Ira Gershwin, George Gershwin, songwriters, musical material

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