Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Devil's LaneSex and Race in the Early South$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Catherine Clinton and Michele Gillespie

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780195112436

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195112436.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 August 2019

Clio's Daughters Southern Colonial Women and Their Historians

Clio's Daughters Southern Colonial Women and Their Historians

Chapter:
(p.15) 2 Clio's Daughters Southern Colonial Women and Their Historians
Source:
The Devil's Lane
Author(s):

Carol Berkin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195112436.003.0002

This chapter reconstructs the lives of southern colonial women in order to understand the relationship between race and gender. It notes that the scholarship on southern colonial women forces a reinterpretation of any generalization that have developed—and a canonized usage—about gender ideals, and the impetus or motive forces behind their change or persistence. It focuses on three areas of scholarship—demographic studies, legal studies, and the study of women's work roles, in the home and in the field. It explains that the demographic literature provided by southern colonial women historians provides the knowledge about women's lives and experiences. It explores the historically particular institutional environment in which colonial white southern women operated and about the social world in which they functioned. It also outlines the demographic profile of African-American women in the early South.

Keywords:   southern colonial white women, Southern colonial African-American women, gender, demographic studies, legal studies, work roles, historians

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .