Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
‘There Are No Slaves in France’The Political Culture of Race and Slavery in the Ancien Régime$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sue Peabody

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780195101980

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195101980.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 September 2019

The Police des Noirs, 1776–1777

The Police des Noirs, 1776–1777

Chapter:
(p.106) 7 The Police des Noirs, 1776–1777
Source:
‘There Are No Slaves in France’
Author(s):

Sue Peabody

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195101980.003.0008

Louis XVI issued the third and final major piece of legislation regulating the entry of black subjects to the kingdom of France on August 9, 1777, known as the Police des Noirs. This royal declaration varied considerably from the Edict of October 1716 and the Declaration of December 15, 1738, since this prescribed actions based on skin color alone, rather than the slave status. The Police des Noirs was also registered by the Parlement of Paris. Minister of the Marine Sartine intentionally advocated the use of racial language as a way to avoid the parlement's opposition to legislation with the word slave. The Police des Noirs was prompted by court cases in which slaves sued for their freedom.

Keywords:   Louis XVI, Police des Noirs, Edict of October 1716, Declaration of 1738, slaves, Parlement of Paris, freedom, skin color

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .