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Women, Culture, and CommunityReligion and Reform in Galveston, 1880–1920$
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Elizabeth Hayes Turner

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780195086881

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195086881.001.0001

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Introduction: The Multiple Meanings of Culture, Community, Religion, and Reform

Introduction: The Multiple Meanings of Culture, Community, Religion, and Reform

Chapter:
(p.3) Introduction: The Multiple Meanings of Culture, Community, Religion, and Reform
Source:
Women, Culture, and Community
Author(s):

Elizabeth Hayes Turner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195086881.003.0001

This chapter discusses women who made a difference in a New South city. It gives an overview on how the movement for change by women in the South played out in a local setting where they lived and worked. They are representatives of southern women who left the private realm of their homes, entered the public arena and transformed the cultural and political landscape of their communities. There were three major aspects that were considered for the study: identity of the southern women, importance of religion, class and race and the consequences of women's civic activism. White women played the race card to their advantage in gaining political power while African American women countered this with resilience and an investment in their own community. Galveston was a laboratory for understanding the complexities of gender and race.

Keywords:   women, South, identity, race, civic activism, Galveston, gender, class, religion

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