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Jewish-Christian DialogueA Jewish Justification$
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David Novak

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780195072730

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195072730.001.0001

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Maimonides's View of Christianity

Maimonides's View of Christianity

Chapter:
(p.57) 3 Maimonides's View of Christianity
Source:
Jewish-Christian Dialogue
Author(s):

David Novak

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195072730.003.0004

The present legal status of Christianity is presented in this chapter. Maimonides views Christianity together with Islam. For Maimonides, Christianity and Islam are related to Judaism. Maimonides's practical view of Christianity was usually assumed to be negative and he regarded Christianity as a form of proscribed polytheism, even for gentiles. In his code of Jewish law, Mishneh Torah, Maimonides basically restated his judgment about the idolatrous status of Christianity without repeating the reasons he gave in his earlier works. As a theologian, he took regularly strong exemption to Christian Trinitarianism. Maimonides ranked Islam superior than Christianity on theological grounds. For him, Christianity is the prime example of the error of such anthropomorphism in its original doctrine of the Incarnation and in its associated doctrine of the Trinity.

Keywords:   Maimonides, Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Trinitarianism, Mishneh Torah, Trinity, antropomorphism

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