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MenckenThe American Iconoclast$
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Marion Elizabeth Rodgers

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780195072389

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195072389.001.0001

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THE DRY MILLENNIUM DAWNS

THE DRY MILLENNIUM DAWNS

Chapter:
(p.211) 20 THE DRY MILLENNIUM DAWNS
Source:
Mencken
Author(s):

Marion Elizabeth Rodgers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195072389.003.0021

The 1920s began with the advent of the Eighteenth Amendment, Prohibition, which Mencken viewed as the ultimate violation of the civil liberties that he cherished. His battle against Prohibition was accompanied by his efforts to reinvigorate the Baltimore Sun, to make it free to deal honestly and realistically with politicians and the American scene. Mencken's efforts to embrace these ideals in his newspaper prepare the reader to comprehend his disillusionment with the practice of journalism in the years ahead. For the next eighteen years until 1938, Mencken wrote a weekly “Monday Article”, different from “The Free Lance” diatribes that he wrote years earlier. Without straining for effect, Mencken addressed issues of civil liberty and free speech, and became a leading national voice.

Keywords:   Eighteenth Amendment, Prohibition, civil liberties, journalism, Baltimore Sun, Monday Articles, writing style, Red Scare, Ku Klux Klan

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