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The Head-Neck Sensory Motor System$
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Alain Berthoz, Werner Graf, and P. P. Vidal

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780195068207

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195068207.001.0001

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Excitatory and Inhibitory Mechanisms Involved in the Dynamic Control of Posture during the Cervicospinal Reflexes

Excitatory and Inhibitory Mechanisms Involved in the Dynamic Control of Posture during the Cervicospinal Reflexes

Chapter:
(p.179) Chapter 26 Excitatory and Inhibitory Mechanisms Involved in the Dynamic Control of Posture during the Cervicospinal Reflexes
Source:
The Head-Neck Sensory Motor System
Author(s):

Ottavio Pompeiano

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195068207.003.0026

The main structure that regulates posture in decerebrate animals is the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN), whose descending verstibulospinal (VS) pathway excites mono- and polysynaptically ipsilateral neck and limb extensor motoneurons. However, in the addition to the LVN, there are two other structures that exert an antagonistic influence on posture. The first region is represented by the medical aspect of the medullary reticular formation, from which the inhibitory reticulospinal (RS) pathway acting on ipsilateral limb extensor motoneurons originates. This area is under the tonic excitatory influence of a dorsal tegmental region whose neurons, located in the peri-locus ceruleus and the neighboring pontine reticular formation (PRF) are cholinosensitive and also cholinergic in nature.

Keywords:   posture, lateral vestibular nucleus, motoneurons, reticulospinal pathway, pontine reticular formation

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