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Immigration ReconsideredHistory, Sociology, and Politics$
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Virginia Yans-McLaughlin

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780195055108

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195055108.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.3) Introduction
Source:
Immigration Reconsidered
Author(s):

Virginia Yans-McLaughlin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195055108.003.0001

Since about the middle of the 16th century, one hundred million people have emigrated from their homelands to new places. By chance or by choice, almost half of these world travelers settled in the United States; the free men among them, at least, were hinging their hopes on democracy, rich natural resources, and American enterprise. The subject of immigration continues to arouse public and scholarly controversy, much of it rooted in these different descriptions of, or prescriptions for, national identity. This book brings together chapters which reveal or directly explain how the disciplines and methodologies of history, sociology, and political science interpret a broad scope of immigration issues, including restriction policy, individual and ethnic group experience, and the place of American immigration itself in the history of the world.

Keywords:   United States, immigration, slave traders, national identity, Frank Thistlethwaite

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