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Lord Elgin and the Marbles$
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William St. Clair

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780192880536

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192880536.001.0001

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Elgin Offers his First Collection to the Government

Elgin Offers his First Collection to the Government

Chapter:
(p.173) 16 Elgin Offers his First Collection to the Government
Source:
Lord Elgin and the Marbles
Author(s):

William St. Clair

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192880536.003.0016

Lord Elgin's way of life took a huge turn when he lost his seat in the House of Lords and a result of how he had parole to the French government. As such, his visits to London were rare after he returned home from France in 1806. He allowed his deformed nose to prevent him from mingling with others, and he could not afford to run and maintain Broomhall — his unfurnished country house in Fife. Elgin got married again, and he had to face more trouble in terms of finances since he had to support his children from both his first and second marriages. Although Elgin could not afford to maintain his house in London where he kept the marbles, the house could not be sold unless the marbles were removed. His only alternative, since he was facing a lack of funds, was to try to sell the collection to the government.

Keywords:   London, Broomhall, finances, lack of funds, marbles, government

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