Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Paul: A Critical Life$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jerome Murphy-OʼConnor

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780192853424

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192853424.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 13 November 2019

Conversion and its Consequences

Conversion and its Consequences

Chapter:
(p.71) 4 Conversion and its Consequences
Source:
Paul: A Critical Life
Author(s):

Jerome Murphy-oʼconnor

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192853424.003.0004

Luke mentioned three circumstantial accounts of Paul's conversion. The chapter argues that Paul's conversion and call to ministry are inseparable. This chapter discussed the process of ‘recognition appearances’. It also examined Paul's Pharisaic knowledge of Jesus. Paul sees his conversion was for the Gentiles due to his understanding that it is a commission to preach the gospel among pagans like those who were in Arabia. The chapter also accounts how Paul supported his mission in Damascus as a tent-maker, as a sign of independence from the Church in Jerusalem; and his agreement with the apostle Peter in relation to the conference in Jerusalem. Lastly, the ‘missing years’ of Paul's career, his works with Barnabas, and the dangers he had encountered in his mission was also cited in this chapter.

Keywords:   conversion, recognition appearances, Gentiles, Arabia, Damascus, Peter, missing years, Barnabas

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .