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The National Study of Health and Growth$
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Roberto Rona and Susan Chinn

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780192629197

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192629197.001.0001

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Secular trend in height

Secular trend in height

Chapter:
(p.27) 4 Secular trend in height
Source:
The National Study of Health and Growth
Author(s):

Roberto J. Rona

Susan Chinn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192629197.003.0004

When it was designed, it was envisaged that the trends in rates of growth (i.e., velocity) would be monitored; this proved impractical. The NSHG provided unique evidence of trends in attained height of primary school children in England and Scotland from 1972 to 1994, and of the larger ethnic minority groups from 1983 to 1993. An upwards trend was observed in all groups, with slightly greater increases in boys than in girls. Estimates from a number of publications are brought together in this chapter. A negative trend on girls from 1979 to 1986 was probably due to chance, but was reported to have raised some concern at the Department of Health. A decrease in average family size was associated with about 50% of the increase in height.

Keywords:   boys, ethnic minorities, girls, growth, height, secular trend

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